Too Many Children Lack Family Support: Third Review

Is it acceptable that over 67,000 children are in state care, without a permanent home, and that a high percentage leave state care at age 16 or 18 without support that other children get from their families? On September 26, the UN Committee on the Rights of the Child will ask Canada what is being …

Canada’s Third Review: Ready or Not

On September 26 and 27 the UN Committee on the Rights of the Child will ask the Canadian government questions about children  in Canada.  How will Canada respond to evidence that shows the rights of some children are not being fulfilled? The CCRC has submitted its assessment and additional evidence in response to a list of …

National Children’s Advocate before Parliament

MP Marc Garneau introduced a private member’s bill to establish a National Children’s Commissioner in Canada.  This is one tool for children’s rights that has worked well in other countries.  The CCRC advocates for such an office with a strong mandate that includes investigating complaints from young people.  Garneau’s bill will be debated in the …

What’s MIssing in Budget 2012?

Children are missing in a federal budget that focuses on preparing for Canada’s future.  Investing in child and youth development is as important for a sustainable future as reviewing old age assistance.  Developing the full potential of every child makes good economic sense as well as being the right thing to do.  Read and share …

Canadian Children on Agenda of UN Committee

The UN Committee on the Rights of the Child is reviewing Canada’s implementation of the Convention.  This is the third review.  The CCRC met with the commitee on February 6 to highlight the priorities in our report, Right in Principle, Right in Practice, and answer questions about the situation of children in Canada.  Our report, …

Appeal to Senate to Keep Youth Out of Jails

Proposed changes to the youth justice system, part of the omnibus crime bill, will mean more young people go to jail, where they are more likely to learn about crime than about how to be rights-respecting, law-abiding citizens. These changes violate the Convention. The Convention makes sense. Bill C-10 needs to be changed.